G20: SHAPING AN INTERCONNECTED WORLD (2017 | Issue 2)

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civil societies

What’s Up, Germany? spoke to India’s representatives of the civil society groups at the 2017 G20 about their expectations. Here’s what they had to say.

Chandrajit Banerjee, Director General, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII)

BUSINESS 20 (B20)

Over the years, G20 has steadily influenced global policy decisions, leading to stronger connects between the developed and the emerging economies, thereby fostering balanced and sustainable growth. As the B20 secretariat for India, CII looks forward to working with its partners in the B20 to help build a strong and resilient global economy.

— Chandrajit Banerjee, director general, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII)

Vidisha Mishra, junior fellow & gender lead, Observer Research Foundation (ORF)

WOMEN 20 (W20)

The German G20 Presidency has been consistent in recognising the centrality of women’s economic empowerment to the success of the overall agenda, particularly through its Women 20 engagement group of the G20. Now in its third year, the W20 has been extremely active in global consultation processes and has articulated clear, measurable targets for improving the quality of women’s economic and social participation. It is also promising that unparalleled focus has been given to the highly relevant issue of women’s unequal access to information and communications technology (ICT) and the emerging skills gap, particularly in developing countries.

— Vidisha Mishra, junior fellow & gender lead, Observer Research Foundation (ORF)

Dr Rajat Kathuria, director, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)

THINK 20 (T20)

The world is witnessing an unprecedented rise in nationalism that could inter alia manifest in protectionism of a debilitating kind for the world economy. So it is even more important to keep the G20 dialogue going, since no one country can manage the deep-seated challenges of climate change, migration, refugees and rising protectionism alone. A global agenda needs a coordinated international strategy, and the T20 can provide the intellectual basis for world leaders to craft one.

— Dr Rajat Kathuria, director, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)

Gagan Sabharwal, director, Global Trade Development, NASSCOM

BUSINESS 20 (B20)

Technology is touching our lives in more ways than one, and with the digital explosion these touch points are set to grow manifold. But this also opens up a debate around security and privacy of data sets that are collected and unloaded in the virtual world. It should be our endeavour to institutionalise this as a prerequisite to safeguard the interest of innocent users.

— Gagan Sabharwal, director, Global Trade Development, NASSCOM

Shailesh Singhal, president, St Joseph’s College Students’ Union

YOUTH 20 (Y20)

I expect the G20 countries to take leadership in establishing institutions for the development of youth governance. Young people participating in governance as elected members of youth parliaments and youth councils can be powerful catalysts for change. Through the Y20 engagement across the G20 countries, innovative ways of implementing the measures laid out in the G20 leaders’ communiqué can be developed and carried out by institutions led by the youth.

— Shailesh Singhal, president, St Joseph’s College Students’ Union

“It’s very important for us all to understand that we are interconnected and we need to hold hands together, especially when the going gets tough.”
— Michelle Yeoh, actress